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SOUTH AFRICAN QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY 
REGISTERED UNIT STANDARD: 

Conduct a guided biome experience 
SAQA US ID UNIT STANDARD TITLE
335815  Conduct a guided biome experience 
ORIGINATOR
Task Team - Guiding 
PRIMARY OR DELEGATED QUALITY ASSURANCE FUNCTIONARY
-  
FIELD SUBFIELD
Field 11 - Services Hospitality, Tourism, Travel, Gaming and Leisure 
ABET BAND UNIT STANDARD TYPE PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL CREDITS
Undefined  Regular  Level 4  NQF Level 04  10 
REGISTRATION STATUS REGISTRATION START DATE REGISTRATION END DATE SAQA DECISION NUMBER
Reregistered  2018-07-01  2023-06-30  SAQA 06120/18 
LAST DATE FOR ENROLMENT LAST DATE FOR ACHIEVEMENT
2024-06-30   2027-06-30  

In all of the tables in this document, both the pre-2009 NQF Level and the NQF Level is shown. In the text (purpose statements, qualification rules, etc), any references to NQF Levels are to the pre-2009 levels unless specifically stated otherwise.  

This unit standard does not replace any other unit standard and is not replaced by any other unit standard. 

PURPOSE OF THE UNIT STANDARD 
The learner who achieves this Unit Standard will be able to conduct a guided experience within a biome and its relevant geographical sub-regions.

The training of guides to conduct tours through the biomes of South Africa will enable them to provide a closely integrated interpretation of the natural resources and attractions, showing the interdependence of climate, weather, rock and soil abiotic factors intermingled with biotic features such as vegetation and animal life. The sound ecological and conservationist approach made possible by taking the biome as an integrated entity should lead to meaningful interpretations and therefore client satisfaction, with possible returns to the area. This should hold distinct benefits for the sub field as a whole.

Learners must select a biome from the biomes indicated in the Assessment Criteria and complete the unit standard for that biome only.

On achievement of this Unit Standard the learner will understand and be able to:
  • Identify the geographical regions of a biome and associated vegetation types.
  • Name, identify and describe the indicator animal and plant species in a biome.
  • Explain the ecology of a biome and its various sub-divisions.
  • Describe the geology, climate and general weather patterns of a biome and its geographical sub-regions. Explain the protected natural areas of interest within the biome.

    On completion of this unit standard the learner should be ready to develop learning in further, more complex processes related to guiding within South African biomes. 

  • LEARNING ASSUMED TO BE IN PLACE AND RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING 
    It is assumed that learners are competent in:
  • Conduct a guided nature experience at NQF Level 3.
  • Communication at NQF Level 2. 

  • UNIT STANDARD RANGE 
    Where applicable, range statements have been included under individual specific outcomes or assessment criteria. In general, interpretations should be done within the area of the biome while conducting the guided experience. 

    Specific Outcomes and Assessment Criteria: 

    SPECIFIC OUTCOME 1 
    Identify the geographical regions of a biome and associated vegetation types. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 1 
    The various biomes are described in accordance with the geographical regions. 
    ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    Range statement for geographical regions:
  • Savanna biome Range: Kalahari; Bushveld; Lowveld.
  • Desert biome Range: Southern Namib Desert; Gariep Desert.
  • Forest biome Range: Eastern Cape Dune Forest, Drakensberg Escarpment Forest, Kwa-Zulu Natal Midlands Forest, Southern and South Western Cape Mountain Forests.
  • Fynbos biome Range: Northern Cape; Western Cape; South Western Cape; Southern Cape; South Eastern. Cape.
  • Grassland biome Range: Western region, Central inland plateau region, Northern region, Eastern inland plateau region, Eastern Mountain and Escarpment region, Eastern lowland region, comprising 15 grassland vegetation types.
  • Indian Ocean Coastal Belt biome Range: Maputaland, KwaZulu-Natal, Pondoland, Transkei.
  • Nama Karoo biome Range: Bushmanland Nama Karoo; Upper Nama Karoo; Orange River Nama Karoo; Eastern Mixed Nama Karoo; Great Nama Karoo; Central Lower Nama Karoo.
  • Succulent Karoo biome Range: Strandveld Succulent Karoo, Upland Succulent Karoo, Lowland Succulent Karoo (Namaqualand), Little Succulent Karoo.
  • Thicket biome Range: Dune Thicket, Valley thicket, Xeric succulent thicket, Mesic succulent thicket, Spekboom succulent thicket.
     

  • ASSESSMENT CRITERION 2 
    The dominant vegetation type in each sub-group is described in terms of its propagation, nutritional value, sustainability and impact on the environment. 
    ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    Range Statement for sub-groups:
  • Savanna biome Range included but not limited to: 25 recognised sub-vegetation types. e.g. Thorny Kalahari dune bushveld, Sweet bushveld, Clay thorn bushveld, Mopane bushveld, Sour lowveld bushveld.
  • Desert biome Range included but not limited to: 15 recognised vegetation types. e.g. Noms Mountain Desert, Alexander Bay Coastal Duneveld, Western Gariep Plains Desert, Richtersberg Mountain Desert.
  • Forest biome Range: Coastal Forest, Afromontane Forest, Sand Forest.
  • Fynbos biome Range: True Fynbos: Proteoids, Ericoids, Restioids; Renosterveld: Renosterbos.
  • Grassland biome Range: Sweetveld and Sourveld grasses; Rocky highveld grassland; Moist clay highveld grassland; Dry clay highveld grassland; Dry sandy highveld grassland; Moist sandy highveld grassland; Moist cool highveld grassland; Moist cold highveld grassland; Wet cold highveld grassland, Moist upland grassland; North-eastern mountain grassland; South-eastern mountain grassland; Afro mountain grassland; Alti mountain grassland; Short mistbelt grassland and Coastal grassland.
  • Indian Ocean Coastal Belt biome Range included but not limited to: 5 recognised sub-vegetation types. e.g. Maputaland Coastal Belt, Maputaland Wooded Grassland, KwaZulu-Natal Coastal Belt, Pondoland-Ugu Sandstone Coastal Sourveld, Transkei Coastal Belt.
  • Nama Karoo biome Range: Cauliflower ganna, Bushman grass, Kapokbush, Silverkaroo, Perdekaroo, Quiver Tree, Bushman poison tree, Bitterkaroo, Anchor Karoo, Wild pomegranate, Ghombos, Seasonal grass species.
  • Succulent Karoo biome Range: Dwarf succulent shrubs: Vygies (Aizoaceae); Ruschia; Conophytum; Surings (Oxalis) Stonecrops (Crassulaceae), Daisies (Asteraceae), Spekboom (Portulacaria afra).
  • Thicket biome Range: Coastal White Milkwood, Coastal red Milkwood, Dune Kokotree, Tree Euphorbia spp, Blue Flowered Plumbago, Cape Honeysuckle, Succulent Spekboom, Shrub Euphorbia spp.
     

  • ASSESSMENT CRITERION 3 
    The differences within a biome area are explained in terms of fauna, flora, geology and climate. 
    ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
  • Savanna biome Range: Dominant vegetation type: variations in amount of grass, tree and shrub cover; specific plant and animal groups associated with savanna sub-regions.
  • Desert Biome Range: Dominant vegetation type: variations in species contribution to grass, tree and shrub cover; specific plant and animal groups associated with Desert sub-regions.
  • Forest biome Range: Dominant vegetation type: variations in amount of grass, tree and shrub cover, specific plant and animal groups associated with Forest sub-regions.
  • Fynbos biome Range:True Fynbos: unique plant groups: Proteoids, Ericas, Restioids-often bulbous geophytes; Renosterveld: resembles Fynbos: renosterbos: Elytropappus; unique animal groups: specific animals intimately associated with Fynbos elements.
  • Grassland biome Range: Dominant vegetation type: variations in amount of grass, tree and shrub cover, C3 and C4 grass types, specific plant and animal groups associated with Grassland sub-regions.
  • Indian Ocean Coastal Belt biome Range: Dominant vegetation type: variations in amount of grass, tree and shrub cover; specific plant and animal groups associated with Indian Ocean Coastal Belt sub-regions.
  • Nama Karoo biome Range: Influence of rainfall variations within the biome, Geophytes, variations in grass cover, distribution of dwarf shrubs and various succulent plants confined to parts of the biome, 386 plant species endemic with 67 threatened, specific plant and animal species associated with Nama Karoo like the number of Larks that occur in the biome.
  • Succulent Karoo biome Range: Namaqualand seasonal uniqueness, bulbous geophytes, little Karoo Spekboom, specific plant and animal groups associated with Succulent Karoo sub-regions.
  • Thicket biome Range: Dominant vegetation types, variations in amount of woody species, vines and creepers, shrubs, succulents, grasses and forbs, specific plant and animal groups associated with Thicket sub-regions.
     

  • SPECIFIC OUTCOME 2 
    Name, identify and describe the indicator animal and plant species in a biome. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 1 
    Indicator species are physically identified and placed within sub-groups. 
    ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    Range statement for indicators:
  • Savanna biome Range included but not limited to: Gemsbok, Ground Hornbill, Cape Griffon, Pygmy Falcon, Sociable Weaver, White Rhino, Wild dog, Short-eared Trident Bat, Starbust Horned Baboon Spider, Endemics.
  • Desert biome Range included but not limited to: Richtersveld Dwarf Leaf-toed Gecko, Desert Mountain Adder, Parabuthus villosus (scorpion), Hadogenes zumpti (scorpion), Angolan Hairy Bat, Hartmann's Mountain Zebra, Dassie Rat, Damara Ground Squirrel, Augur Buzzard, Endemics.
  • Forest biome Range: Outeniqua Yellowwood, Rameron Pigeon, Crowned Eagle, Chorister Robin, Knysna Lourie, Cape Parrot, Samango Monkey, Gaboon Adder, Pink Velvet Worm, Rumohra Fern, Black Stinkwood, Endemics.
  • Fynbos biome Range: True Fynbos: Proteoids, Ericoids, Restioids-often bulbous geophytes; Renosterveld: resembles Fynbos: Renosterbos-Elytropappus-Asteraceae, formerly Compositae. Animals: Cape sugarbird, Orange breasted sunbird, Geometric tortoise, Micro frog, Bontebok, Endemics.
  • Grassland biome Range: Star Flower, Giant Bullfrog, Blue Crane, Karkloof Blue Butterfly, Redwing Francolin, Black Wilderbeest, Blesbok, Themeda triandra, Endemics.
  • Indian Ocean Coastal Belt biome Range included but not limited to: Kentani Dwarf Chameleon, Pickersgill's Reed Frog, Smith's Dwarf Burrowing Skink, Lemon-breasted Canary, Palm-nut Vulture, Strelitzia Nicolai, Endemics.
  • Nama Karoo biome Range included but not limited to: annuals and non-succulent shrubs; geophytes; Kapokbush, Silverkaroo, Perdekaroo, Quiver Tree, Bushman poison tree, Bitterkaroo, Anchor Karoo, Wild pomegranate, Ghombos, Cinnamon-breasted Warbler; Sclater's Lark, Mountain Zebra, Bokmakierie, Brown Locust, Namaqua Sandgrouse, Riverine Rabit, Karoo Padloper, Fisk's House Snake, Red Lark, Endemics.
  • Succulent Karoo biome Range included but not limited to: Halfmens, Chat Flycatcher, Desert Rainfrog, Toontjies, Granulated Thick-tail Scorpion, Bastard Quiver Tree.
  • Thicket biome Range included but not limited to: African Elephant, Black rhino, Kudu, Tree Dassie, Addo Dung Beetle, Albany Adder, Albany Cycad, Kabusi Stream Damsel, Crane Flower, Malachite Sunbird, Cape Honeysuckle, Milkwoods.
     

  • ASSESSMENT CRITERION 2 
    The obvious signs and sounds left or made by animals in a biome are identified and valid elementary scientific and/or cultural explanations of their features are explained in terms of their behavioural patterns. 
    ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    Signs include but are not limited to tracks, signs, droppings, scrapings, burrows, bones, evidence of feeding.
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 3 
    The biological biodiversity within a biome is described and demonstrated in broad taxonomical context using relevant examples. 
    ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    Biological biodiversity includes but is not limited to mammals, reptiles, birds, amphibians, arthropods, fish, trees, grasses, shrubs, forbs.
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 4 
    The diversity within a biome is identified in terms of its fauna and flora. 

    SPECIFIC OUTCOME 3 
    Explain the ecology of a biome and its various sub-divisions. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 1 
    Plant survival strategies to conditions within the various regions of a biome are described in accordance with. 
    ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    Range statement for strategies:
  • Savanna biome Range included but not limited to: Leafless woody species in the dry season; timing of seed dispersal; protective grass root sand sheath; tannin production and toxic sap in plants; development of thorns; diaspore dispersal and germination through animal feeding, epiphytes.
  • Desert biome Range included but not limited to: leaf, stem and root succulents; die-back; moisture absorption; rapid response; seed dispersal and longevity; radiation absorption; production of toxic saps; development of spines.
  • Forest biome Range: Shallow root system; development of feeder roots; leaf-litter nutrient supply; translocation of leaf nutrients from old leaves to new leaves; leaf-shedding in mid-summer; adaptation to nutrient poor soils conditions, adaptation to growth position in terms of the tree canopy and climatic conditions, low light intensities, dispersal of seed by birds and bats.
  • Fynbos biome Range: specific morphological adaptations of leaves and root systems of Fynbos plants as a survival strategy against the hot dry summers in their areas of distribution. Fungal mycorrhiza in the survival of Fynbos stands.
  • Grassland biome Range: Protective covering known as Rhizosheaths containing nitrogen fixing bacteria; storage of surplus nutrients below the ground for the growing period; provision of food for grazers as part of grass lifecycle, the effect of frost and the importance of fire for future development preventing moribund, decreaser species, increaser species.
  • Indian Ocean Coastal Belt biome Range included but not limited to: air-moisture saturation, absence of entirely rain-free dry period, high water table; leaf structure, seed dispersal; canopy and wind pruning.
  • Nama Karoo Range: Succulent leaved dwarf-shrubs -adaptations to saline or calcareous soil conditions; storage of water in roots systems and thick leaves; deciduous response to high frequency drought conditions; Camouflage and mimicry-kalkvygie, "flowering stones", underground geophyte adaptation.
  • Succulent Karoo biome Range: Evasion through phemerality versus tolerance through succulence; rapid completion of life cycles during favourable conditions; long-lived seeds; low competitiveness due to diversity; thick outer skin; waxy or hairy outer surfaces; few and/or sunken stomata to decrease water loss; absorption of CO at night; bladder cells of vygies; withdrawal of plant underground; climate related seed capsule opening; few or no leaves; underground geophyte adaptation.
  • Thicket biome Range included but not limited to: Seed dispersal by means of birds and arboreal mammal species, protection from fire by growing in valleys.
     

  • ASSESSMENT CRITERION 2 
    Animal survival strategies to conditions within the various regions of a biome are described with examples. 
    ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    Range statement for strategies:
  • Savanna biome Range included but not limited to: Animal cooling methods such as countershading; camouflage; selective seasonal feeding changes; specific activity periods.
  • Desert biome Range included but not limited to: cooling methods such as countershading, sand-swimming, orientation; camouflage; dew and fog collection; selective seasonal feeding changes; specific activity periods.
  • Forest biome Range: Solitary or small group structure; nocturnal activity; counter shading, camouflage, dappled sunlight camouflage.
  • Fynbos biome Range: the unique role of Cape sunbirds as pollinating agents in Fynbos elements. (for e.g. Cape sugar birds on proteoids and the orange breasted sunbird on Ericas), role played by ants, particularly the pugnacious ant in the dispersal of Fynbos seed is highlighted to clients.(ant dispersal is myrmecochory).
  • Grassland biome Range: Animal cooling methods, countershading, camouflage, selective seasonal feeding changes, specific activity periods, migration.
  • Indian Ocean Coastal Belt biome Range included but not limited to: temperature and moisture control, counter-shading; camouflage; selective feeding; specific activity periods; shelter selection.
  • Nama Karoo Range included but not limited to: Rainfrogs only surfacing at night in heavy fog, brown locust outbreaks.
  • Succulent Karoo biome Range included but not limited to: Rainfrogs only surfacing at night in heavy fog.
  • Thicket biome Range includes but is not limited to: Mainly arboreal mammal species; monkeys, galagos, squirrels and hyrax live off the fruits.
     

  • ASSESSMENT CRITERION 3 
    The importance of interactions between organisms and the environment of a biome is explained with examples from the area of operation. 
    ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    Mutualism, Commensalism, parasitism, predation, food chains and food webs.
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 4 
    The relationship between soils, plant and animal life is explained with reference to the soil Catenas of a biome. 
    ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    Range statement for soils:
  • Savanna biome Range included but not limited to: sandy soils-large leaved plants; Seeplines-indicator species; clay soils-woody species, water drainage and retention.
  • Desert biome Range included but not limited to: loamy-sandy soils - Brownanthus sp.; Saline soils - indicator species; aluvium-gallery forest; gypsum levels-lichen species; water drainage and retention.
  • Forest biome Range: Closed canopy, humidity, temperature, hard forest edge, waterlogged conditions and effect on leaching of nutrients; shallow root system and feeder roots.
  • Fynbos biome Range: Effect of wind on Fynbos, particularly its role in pollination and the adaptation of Fynbos diaspores/disseminules such as seed, the unique role of fire.
  • Grassland biome Range: Leaching of soil nutrients in sweetveld becoming acidic, Seeplines-indicator species; drainage and retention.
  • Indian Ocean Coastal Belt biome Range included but not limited to: nutrient-stressed soils, refugia, salinity, water drainage and retention.
  • Nama Karoo Range: Raised mounds caused by termite activity lead to rich alkaline soils which contain more organic matter and more moisture support for different distinctive types plant communities; Brown Locust seasonal frass, Mutualism; Commensalism; parasitism; predation; food chains and food webs.
  • Succulent Karoo biome Range: Raised mounds of calcium-rich soil, created by termites which support distinctive plant communities.
  • Thicket biome Range included but not limited to: Sandy soils-large leaved plants; Seeplines-indicator species; clay soils-woody species, water drainage and retention.
     

  • SPECIFIC OUTCOME 4 
    Describe the geology, climate and general weather patterns of a biome and its geographical sub-regions. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 1 
    The geological history of the biome is explained with reference to the rock and soil types that occur there. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 2 
    The general climatic conditions and seasonal changes that occur within the biome is explained with examples. 
    ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    Temperature variations, annual rainfall, types of precipitation and wind, the effect of climate on vegetation growth.
     

    SPECIFIC OUTCOME 5 
    Explain the protected natural areas of interest within the biome. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 1 
    A list is provided of the protected natural areas within a biome in terms of endemic species and/or special interest phenomena. 
    ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    Range statement for natural areas:
  • Savanna biome Range: Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park, Waterberg, Kruger National Park, Sabi Sand, Timbavati, Hluhluwe-Umfolozi, Mkuzi, Tembe Elephant Park, Silez Nature reserve, Mabula, Lapalala wilderness, Pilanesberg, Madikwe Game reserve.
  • Desert biome Range: Ai-Ais/Richtersveld National Park, Nababiep Nature Reserve, Cornellskop, Richtersveld Cultural and Botanical Landscape World Heritage Site, Orange River Mouth Ramsar Site
  • Forest biome Range: Amatola Forests (Hogsback), Tsitsikamma Forest, St Lucia, Natures Valley, Grootbosch Nature Reserve, Magoebaskloof, Blyde River Canyon, etc.
  • Fynbos biome Range: Cape Point Nature Reserve, Kirstenbosch National Botanical Garden, Cape Flats Private Nature Reserve, Grootbos Nature Reserve, De Hoop Nature Reserve, Dassieshoek Nature Reserve, Table Mountain National Park.
  • Grassland biome Range: Golden Gate Highland National Park, Sterkfontein Dam Nature Reserve, Willem Pretorius Nature Reserve, Suikerbosrand Nature Reserve, Blyde River Canyon Nature Reserve, Songimvelo Nature Reserve, Drakensberg reserves, Itala Game Reserve, Boskop Dam Nature Reserve, Bloemhof Dam Nature Reserve, Mountain Zebra National Park.
  • Indian Ocean Coastal Belt biome Range: Vernon Crookes Nature Reserve, Isimangaliso Wetlands Park (Greater St Lucia Wetland Park), Amathikulu Nature Reserve, Mkambati Wildlife Reserve, Oribi Gorge Nature Reserve, Dwesa-Cwebe Wildlife Reserve.
  • Nama Karoo biome Range may include: Mountain Zebra National Park, Karoo National Park, Augrabies Falls National Park, Oviston Provincial Nature Reserve, Doornkloof Provincial Nature Reserve, Rolfontein Provincial Nature Reserve, Anysberg Nature Reserve, Platberg-Karoo Conservancy.
  • Succulent Karoo biome Range included but not limited to: Richtersveld National Park, Namaqua National Park, Goegap Provincial Nature Reserve, Akkerendam Nature Reserve, Vrolikheid Provincial Nature Reserve, Anysberg and Gamkapoort Provincial Nature Reserves.
  • Thicket biome Range includes but is not limited to: Addo Elephant National Park, Andries Vosloo Kudu Reserve, Sam Knott Reserve, Alex Sebe Reserve, Zuurberg Mountain National Park, Central KwaZulu Natal Reserves.
     

  • ASSESSMENT CRITERION 2 
    The need to conserve a biome is explained in terms of the consequences of not carrying out proper conservation management. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 3 
    Urbanization, impoverished population growth and dam building as well as sustainable use of the natural environment is explained in terms of its impact on the long-term ecology of natural areas such as National parks and private game reserves. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 4 
    The role of a biome is explained in terms of recreation and foreign tourism as an important economic consideration for South Africa. 
    ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    Recreation and foreign tourism includes but is not limited to:
  • Game farming, hunting, ecotourism, palaeontology evidence, seasonal flower displays, resort and property development, agriculture, mining, job provision and contribution to the country's economy.
     

  • ASSESSMENT CRITERION 5 
    Threats to a biome are explained in accordance with the impact on the biome. 
    ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    Threats include but are not limited to:
  • Alien plant invasion, urbanisation and expanding impoverished human population, diminishing water supply, climate change, cultivation, afforestation, irrigation, mining, illegal plant collection, high intensity farming interests, mismanagement of timber harvesting.
     

  • ASSESSMENT CRITERION 6 
    Possible solutions to curbing threats to a biome are explained with examples. 
    ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    Solutions include but are not limited to sustainable utilisation of the natural environment; incorporating and benefiting the growing human populations on the outskirts of protected natural areas in proposed sustainable utilisation; alien plant removal-work for water project, protection of endemic species, fire management, accurate environmental impact assessments for proposed urban development, ecotourism, specialist plant tours.
     


    UNIT STANDARD ACCREDITATION AND MODERATION OPTIONS 
  • An individual wishing to be assessed against this unit standard for the purposes of achieving credits, including through the Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL), may apply to an assessment agency, assessor or provider institution recognised for assessment purposes by the relevant Education and Training Quality Assurance body (ETQA), or one with an appropriate Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the relevant ETQA.
  • Anyone assessing a learner against this unit standard must be registered as an assessor with the relevant ETQA, or one with an appropriate MOU with the relevant ETQA.
  • Any institution offering learning that will enable achievement of this unit standard, or assessing this unit standard, for the purposes of achieving credits must be accredited as a provider with the relevant ETQA, or one with an appropriate MOU with the relevant ETQA.
  • Moderation of assessment will be conducted by the relevant ETQA, or one with an appropriate MOU with the relevant ETQA. 

  • UNIT STANDARD ESSENTIAL EMBEDDED KNOWLEDGE 
    The knowledge which should be embedded in the process to enable the learner to become competent in all of the above Specific Outcomes includes:
  • The conducting and concluding of a safe and comprehensive tour through the biome.
  • The geographical regions and the dominant vegetation type in each sub-region of the biome.
  • The most prominent species of animals and plants associated with the biome and its geographical sub-regions.
  • The ecology of the biome and its geographical regions.
  • The geological history, rock and soil types, climatic conditions, temperature variations, annual rainfall, types of precipitation, wind, seasonal changes in weather of the biome.
  • The National Parks, game and nature reserves, Botanical gardens, bird sanctuaries and other protected natural areas that would be of interest to visitors in the biome.
  • The uniqueness of each of these protected areas and why they would be of interest.
  • The conservation management program of the biome and the human influences on the biome. 

  • UNIT STANDARD DEVELOPMENTAL OUTCOME 
    N/A 

    UNIT STANDARD LINKAGES 
    N/A 


    Critical Cross-field Outcomes (CCFO): 

    UNIT STANDARD CCFO ORGANISING 
    Self-organisation is developed and displayed while conducting a guided biome experience for clients. 

    UNIT STANDARD CCFO COMMUNICATING 
    Communication skills are developed when providing descriptions and explanations relating to the biome. 

    UNIT STANDARD CCFO DEMONSTRATING 
    Information evaluation is demonstrated when researching and classifying species and subgroups. 

    UNIT STANDARD CCFO CONTRIBUTING 
    Inter-relatedness of systems is understood when dealing with and describing relationships among elements of the biome. 

    UNIT STANDARD ASSESSOR CRITERIA 
    N/A 

    REREGISTRATION HISTORY 
    As per the SAQA Board decision/s at that time, this unit standard was Reregistered in 2012; 2015. 

    UNIT STANDARD NOTES 
    N/A 

    QUALIFICATIONS UTILISING THIS UNIT STANDARD: 
      ID QUALIFICATION TITLE PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL STATUS END DATE PRIMARY OR DELEGATED QA FUNCTIONARY
    Elective  71549   Further Education and Training Certificate: Tourist Guiding  Level 4  NQF Level 04  Reregistered  2023-06-30  CATHSSETA 


    PROVIDERS CURRENTLY ACCREDITED TO OFFER THIS UNIT STANDARD: 
    This information shows the current accreditations (i.e. those not past their accreditation end dates), and is the most complete record available to SAQA as of today. Some Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionaries have a lag in their recording systems for provider accreditation, in turn leading to a lag in notifying SAQA of all the providers that they have accredited to offer qualifications and unit standards, as well as any extensions to accreditation end dates. The relevant Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionary should be notified if a record appears to be missing from here.
     
    NONE 



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